The Franklin Expedition Breaking the Ice 2015 – Meet the Dive Team

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Parks Canada’s underwater archaeologists and the Royal Canadian Navy’s Fleet Diving Unit Atlantic will dive under the Arctic sea ice this April to study the wreck of HMS Erebus.

Get to know them! More profiles to come soon!

Marc-André Bernier

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist Marc-André Bernier
Marc-André Bernier
© Parks Canada

Name: Marc-André Bernier

Age: I look much younger than I am!

Profession: Underwater archaeologist and Head, Underwater Archaeology Team at Parks Canada

Role in the April ice dive mission: Examine and document the archaeological site, take measurements and document the wreck with photos and videos, and participate in the retrieval of artifacts, if this takes place.

What he will miss the most during the mission: Warm weather … and my family of course! I will bring a photo of them with me.

What his family thinks of the mission: Even though we take all the precautions and safety measures, our loved ones always worry about the risks of our work.

Place of birth: Kapuskasing, Ontario

Languages spoken: French, English and Spanish

Family: Married, together with my wife for 22 years, and proud father of two wonderful daughters, 18 and 12 years old

University: B.A. And M.A. in Ancient Civilisations at the University of Ottawa, teaching degree from the University of Quebec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue

How he became an underwater archaeologist: I had the opportunity to combine my passion for diving with my studies in archaeology.

Favourite subject in high school: Geography

Favourite book: Patrick O’Brian and his historic 20-part saga about Captain Jack Aubrey of the Royal Navy

Memorable archaeological moment: You never know what you will find at an archaeological site; one of my most troubling finds was a plastic tent peg at a 17th c. wreck site. We quickly concluded that it was brought there by a storm.

Favourite sport: Playing hockey and watching my favourite team, the Montreal Canadiens

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: Work hard, persevere and be curious about everything!


Charles Dagneau

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Charles Dagneau
Charles Dagneau
© Parks Canada

Name: Charles Dagneau

Age:x39 years old

Place of birth: Quebec City

Years with Parks Canada: 8 years

Profession: Underwater Archaeologist with Parks Canada

Role in the April ice dive mission: I will be diving to help record the wreck’s remains and I will be in charge of keeping track of the artifacts in a database.

Comments on team working with the Navy: After two weeks of joint training with the Navy, I know that they are good divers, and also really motivated to help us on our project.

What he will miss the most during the mission: My partner Johanne and our young baby Léopold

What his family thinks of the mission: My partner sees this expedition as a great opportunity and a very exciting project. I know it is hard on her that I’m away so often, but she really supports me. She’s very interested in history and the Franklin expedition as well!

Spare time: Spend time with my partner and our baby. We like outdoor activities such as hiking, downhill and cross-country skiing and camping. I also like to go climbing, but I don’t bring our baby (yet) for that!

Languages spoken: French and English, and a bit of Spanish

Studies: I have a Bachelor’s degree in Historical Archaeology and Ethnology from Laval University in Quebec City, a Master’s degree in Art History and Archaeology from the Paris – Sorbonne University, and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Montreal. At every level, my studies were oriented toward maritime and underwater archaeology.

How he became an underwater archaeologist: I had a passion both for scuba diving and history and I decided to combine both so here I am, doing the best job ever!

What motivates him in his work: To be able to combine office and research work with going to dive sites and finding artifacts of the past. It’s a very well balanced mix!

Favourite book: The Dosadi Experiment, a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, where the population of an entire planet is put at risk due to a mysterious experiment that turns bad.

Favourite food: Seafood and, especially, oysters.

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: Work and study hard at school and university, and be determined to find a job.


Aimie Néron

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Aimie Néron
Aimie Néron
© Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer

Name: Aimie Néron

Age: 27 years old

Place of birth: Boucherville, Quebec

Years with Parks Canada: It’s my first!

Profession: Underwater Archaeologist

Role in the April ice dive mission: I will take part in the overall excavation, documenting the wreck and recuperating any artifacts, if this takes place.

What it’s like to work in a field where there are few females: It isn’t always easy but I know that I have a role to play both as a colleague and as a woman. It also helps to have a good sense of humour. Working with men makes me test my limits but also helps me to know my limits. Sometimes I have to use different techniques from my male colleagues or I have to find other ways to achieve the same (or better – ha ha!) results. It keeps me on my toes!

What she will miss the most during the mission: Taking hot showers!

What her relatives think of the mission: They worry a bit about the working conditions I will face in the North, but overall I know they are happy for me and proud of me. My family and friends really support me!

Languages spoken: French and English, and a bit of Spanish.

Studies: I have a Bachelor of Archaeology from the University Laval (Quebec City), and I am in the process of obtaining a Master of Underwater Archaeology from the University of Montreal. In addition, I have completed professional dive training at the Institut maritime du Québec in Rimouski.

Favourite subject in high school: History

What passionate her in her work: Working underwater is what I like the most – there’s nothing like it! The water calms me and helps me concentrate on challenging tasks. I guess you can say I am passionate about water!

Favourite food: My mother’s healthy and delicious cooking

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: Just go for it, it’s so exciting! You have to study and work hard, and job opportunities are not that easy to find, but then you have the chance to explore places other people will never have the chance to see! Diving and studying wrecks that tell our history – it is so rewarding!


Thierry Boyer

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Thierry Boyer
Thierry Boyer
© Parks Canada

Name: Thierry Boyer

Age: 40 years old

Profession: Underwater Archaeologist with Parks Canada

Role in the April ice dive mission: I am one of the six underwater archaeologists that will study the wreck, but since I’m the lead photo and video specialist for the Underwater Archaeology Team, most of the dives that I will be on, I will be either filming or taking photos.

What he will miss the most during the mission: My guess is that the thing I will miss the most is sleep as the work days will be very long! I will miss my family.

What his family thinks of the mission: My partner and daughter are very excited by the fact that I am part of this project. My partner is also an underwater archeologist – she works for the French government – so she understands the passion and value of such an archaeological undertaking.

Hometown: I was born in Greenfield Park on the south shore of Montreal.

Languages spoken: French and English

University: I did my undergraduate studies at Laval University in Québec City, and my Masters in underwater archaeology at the Sorbonne in Paris.

How he became an underwater archaeologist: Ever since I was a kid, I loved playing in water, so diving came naturally to me. I started my studies as an archaeologist and at one point I realized I could actually dive and do archaeology. I started on a project as a volunteer with Parks Canada in 1997, and ever since, I’ve been doing underwater archeology the world over.

Favourite food: Red meat in general, wild meat, better. Moose, deer, goose or even duck are what I really love, but I like beef as well.

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: Persistence and conviction. Believe you can achieve it, and try your best. This is the only way. Underwater archeologists need to be proficient at a lot of things. Most of the time we are away in a very remote location so we need to be able to do a lot of different things. We need to be able to fix engines and cameras and whatever we have because there are no stores where we are.


Filippo Ronca

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Filippo Ronca
Filippo Ronca
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada / Cpl Eric Girard

Name: Filippo Ronca

Age: 45 years

Profession: Dive Officer and Senior Underwater Archaeologist with Parks Canada’s

Role in the April ice dive mission: My role is going to be twofold. First, I will be responsible for the diving safety of our team. Working with my counterparts within Fleet Diving Unit (A) we will ensure that the dive operations go smoothly. Also, as an archaeologist I will be surveying the wreck site.

What he will miss the most during the mission: I will miss my wife Jodi and our two sons, Luca age 6 and Matteo age 4. I think of them when I travel. Actually, during my dives on the Erebus last year, I had a picture of my family with me in my pocket. So they actually dove with me on the HMS Erebus too!

What his family thinks of the mission: They understand the work and they are very supportive although I know it is difficult for my wife, to make arrangements for daycare and look after everything on her own. But, my family’s quite excited. They like seeing pictures and hearing about us on the news. They feel like they can be with me when I do my work.

Place of birth: Peterborough, Ontario

Languages spoken: English, Italian and French

University: I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Classical Studies from Queen’s University, a Bachelor’s Degree in Archaeology from the University of Calgary, and a Master’s degree in Maritime Studies from East Carolina University. That’s where I met Ryan Harris – we actually studied together, in graduate school.

How he became an Underwater Archaeologist: I took the long road! I studied various subjects in university and gravitated towards archaeology. Then I took a diving course and I found out that there was an actual underwater archaeology program where I could combine both interests. And so I went to a university in the United States that had a Master’s program in Underwater Archaeology. From there, I worked as the Assistant State Underwater Archaeologist for the Wisconsin Historical Society. I also did some volunteer and contract projects with the Underwater Archaeology Team of Parks Canada; where I got a real taste of the profession in Canada. Finally I was hired permanently to work with the Underwater Archaeology Team. I have been very fortunate to learn from the previous team members and work for Parks Canada!

Favourite book: I’m reading the Jack Reacher series by Lee Child right now. I also like Mickey Spillane, who writes detective stories.

Memorable archaeological moment: Each site is unique and has its own interesting aspects, for different reasons. We dove on the Empress of Ireland and I found that fascinating but also quite haunting because you’re seeing the remnants of a disaster. It was pretty sombre. But I remember exciting things too. We have also found artifacts that date to thousands of years ago. At each site, wherever we work, there is something amazing and memorable.

Favourite sport: My favourite sport is soccer, which I played a lot as a kid. I also enjoy watching football and hockey – my favourite team is the Senators. And about 10 years ago I learned to play hockey, a sport I didn’t learn to play as a child. So now I play on a recreational team in the summer and also in the winter when we’re not travelling. My team is in the playoffs right now, so I will miss that because of this mission.

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: Well, I would say you have to love diving and you have to love the water. So if you don’t like those things, you have to work on them. Other than that, you have to have a great interest in history. I really enjoyed Canadian history and studying past civilizations and I was fortunate that my parents took me to a lot of museums.


Ryan Harris

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Ryan Harris
Ryan Harris
© Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer

Name: Ryan Harris

Age: 42

Profession: Senior Underwater Archaeologist with Parks Canada’s Underwater Archaeology Team

Role in the April ice dive mission: Lead archaeologist for the survey of HMS Erebus, directing all archaeological activities on site, but also working underwater as a member of the dive team. Research interests include naval architecture, the underwater archaeology of 19th century British polar exploration, and remote sensing applications in underwater archaeology. Will use underwater laser scanning systems manufactured by 2G Robotics of Waterloo, Ontario, to systematically document the wreck of HMS Erebus at very high resolution in 3D.

What he will miss the most during the mission: My three young kids and my darling, ever-patient wife.

What his family thinks of the mission: They are all tired of daddy going North for long stretches every year. But the kids get excited when they hear about the project in school.

Place of birth: Calgary, Alberta

Languages spoken: English and French

University: B.A. in Anthropology (specialist in Archaeology) from the University of Toronto, M.A. in Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology from East Carolina University.

How he became an underwater archaeologist: After high school I attended the University of Toronto, with a mind towards a career in aeronautical engineering. After one semester I realised that it wasn’t exactly what I was looking for, and somehow I struck on the idea of underwater archaeology as a profession. I transferred into the Anthropology Department at first opportunity and have never looked back. Following undergrad, I went off to Grad school in the States to earn my Master’s in Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology, where I also trained as an occupational diver.

Favourite subject in high school: Physics

Favourite book: Moby Dick by Herman Melville (fiction). Stalingrad by Anthony Beevor (non-fiction).

Memorable archaeological moment: First seeing HMS Erebus appear on the sonar screen‎, then making that first incredible dive on the site — a truly surreal, once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Favourite sport: Hockey. I play left defense on a couple of rec league teams in Ottawa. For NHL hockey, I’m a fan of the Ottawa Senators and have been religiously following their odds-defying drive to make the playoffs.

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: To realize a career in underwater archaeology you have to be persistent, focused, and driven. You’ll to need to hone a wide variety of very specialised skills while establishing a suitable professional niche for yourself. I’m very grateful for the opportunity that Parks Canada has given me to do something that I absolutely love doing. There’s no job quite like it.


Flora Davidson

Parks Canada Conservator, Flora Davidson
Flora Davidson
© Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer

Name: Flora Davidson

Age: I’m 15 years younger than Franklin was when he passed away during his expedition.

Profession: I am an archeological and historic object conservator for Parks Canada.

Role in the April ice dive mission: I’ll be in the Arctic to support the underwater archaeologists with any matters pertaining to preservation of artifacts and the shipwreck itself. I will be taking a field kit with supplies in case any artifacts are retrieved. The kit allows us to safely transport artifacts back to the lab for treatment. We’ve already procured supplies and equipment for the lab for this possibility too – just in case. The key is thinking ahead. Conservation of artifacts really starts with planning and preparations well before we get to the site – this often means well before the decision to retrieve artifacts is made!

What she will miss the most during the mission: I’ll miss being active outdoors because we’ll be more or less confined to the tents where it’s warm for much of the time.

What her family thinks of the mission: I know they’re excited about the work I’ll be involved. I’m not so sure they can visualize what it’ll be like on site and how different it is from my day to day work in the lab. For one thing, my lab coat will be replaced by a really good parka!

Hometown: I was born in Birmingham, England but grew up in Vancouver, BC.

Languages spoken: English though since moving to Ottawa, I now understand quite a bit of French.

Family: Partner, Paul, in Ottawa. Though my family is small, we’re spread across several provinces!

University: I have an undergraduate degrees in Cell and Developmental Biology and Fine Arts from the University of British Columbia, and a Masters of Conservation in Historic and Archaeological Objects from the University of Durham in England.

How she became a conservator: It was actually thanks to a random conversation with a friend at the University of British Columbia. I was telling her that I love science and I love arts and I wished I could combine them. She actually knew about conservation and I didn’t. She told me about it and that is where the idea formed for me to become a conservator.

Favourite food: Just one? Right now, I’m really into smoked fish and smoked cheese because we just got a smoker at home.

Most memorable conservation moment: The most unusual circumstances with a find was when I found myself having to share my bedroom with a Roman burial urn with the bones of a baby inside. That was memorable.

Advice to future conservators: Do a lot of reading keep up with research and, particularly when you start out, try to work with as many experienced conservators as you can. For site work, plan and prepare for anything you’re most likely going to find you’re the only conservator on site.


Jonathan Moore

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Jonathan Moore
Jonathan Moore
© Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer

Name: Jonathan Moore

Age: 46 years old

Profession: Senior Underwater Archaeologist with Parks Canada

Role in the April ice dive mission: I’ll be doing some of the underwater work as part of the dive team to survey and record the wreck of HMS Erebus.

What he will miss the most during the mission: My family – my wife and two daughters. But we’re only going to be away for a few weeks this time. Often we’re away from home for a longer time.

What his family thinks of the mission: My family’s really excited about the mission. My daughters ask me questions about what the plan is, what we will be doing, how we’re going to get there and how we’re going to get back.

Hometown: I was born in Banbury, England. I moved to Canada when I was five years old and I grew up in Kingston, Ontario.

Languages spoken: English and French

University: I went to Queen’s University in Kingston where I did my undergraduate degree in Classical Studies. And then I did a Master’s Degree in Maritime Studies at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland.

How he became an underwater archaeologist: I became interested in archaeology at a young age. When I was 14, I attended an archeology field school and got a high school credit for it. For the next four or five summers, I did land archeology in volunteer and paid positions in Kingston. In my first year of university, I learned to dive and got involved in underwater archaeology, joined a few societies and took some training, and by the time I got to my Master’s degree, I had set my sights on a career in underwater archaeology.

Favourite book: Recently, I’ve been trying to work my way through as many of the original primary accounts of the Arctic explorers who preceded and followed Franklin.

Favourite food: I don’t know if you can consider it a food per se, but it is most definitely maple syrup.

Most memorable archaeological find: One of the most amazing finds was the bell on the wreck of the Erebus. Ryan Harris and I were diving together for the first dive on the wreck last year. We were diving along the upper deck of the wreck, side by side, and I happened to be on the side that had the ship’s bell laying on the deck. For sure that was the most amazing thing I’ve seen underwater.

Favourite sport: Soccer. My wife and I watch English Premier League soccer quite religiously. Our team is Chelsea Football Club from London.

Advice to future underwater archaeologists: First and foremost get in touch with underwater archaeologists like our team and others throughout the country to put together a kind of path to the profession. Our team is more than willing to talk to students and provide advice. And be prepared to dedicate yourself to the training required to gain the necessary qualifications, skills and experience. Then stay committed and follow your dreams.


Joe Boucher

Parks Canada Underwater Archaeologist, Joe Boucher
Joe Boucher
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada / Cpl Eric Girard

Name: Joe Boucher

Age: 31 years old

Profession: Underwater Archaeology Technician at Parks Canada

Role in the April ice dive mission: My role will be to support the archaeologists, to dive with them, to look after some of our equipment, and generally to do any other task that needs to be done, or I’m asked to do.

What he will miss the most during the mission: My beautiful wife and my dog, an awesome golden retriever named Fletcher. It’s tough being away from home, and I love them both, so it’ll be good to get home to them afterwards.

Hometown: I was born in Barrie, Ontario and I spent the first 18 years of my life there. I have lived in Ottawa more or less since graduating high school.

What his family thinks of the mission:  I have a wonderful wife who is incredibly supportive of my job. My parents, sister, and brother in law are following the story from back in Barrie. My family and relatives are incredibly supportive of my job, my life and the mission. I think they’re proud of me and excited that I get this opportunity.

Languages spoken: English and some very rudimentary French. I went to French immersion in elementary school.

How he became an underwater archaeology technician: I took a convoluted path to become an underwater archaeology technician. After high school I studied public affairs and policy management at Carleton University but decided against trying to pursue a career in a related field. After that, I travelled for a while. Then I went to Holland College for commercial diving, became a commercial diver and worked in the commercial diving industry for a little while. When the ad was posted for the spot here at Parks Canada, I had all the prerequisites so I applied and I got the job.

Favourite subject in high school: Probably English. I liked reading books and writing.

Favourite book: I really like the entire Hornblower series. They’re great books.

Most memorable archaeological moment: Being relatively new to the field – I’ve been with the team for only 4 years – my most memorable moment was certainly the discovery of the HMS Erebus.

Favourite sport: I like water sports in general: standup paddleboarding, surfing, swimming, rowing, and diving of course.

Advice to future underwater archaeology technicians: Work hard and do your best. People will respect that you put your best effort forward. You might get lucky like I did. Interpersonal skills are really important too. So work on those because you might spend a lot of time with people in secluded areas.


Greg Oickle

Royal Canadian Navy Lieutenant
Greg Oickle
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada / Cpl Eric Girard

Name: Greg Oickle

Age: 38 years old

Profession: Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy, Clearance Diving Officer

Role in the April ice dive mission: Lead planner of the dive team

What he will miss the most during the mission: “Real food”: The freeze-dried boiled bags we will be served in the Arctic are not very tasty!

Hometown: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia

Studies: I have a degree in Psychology from St Mary’s University and then I did officer training with the Navy. There I trained as a Maritime Surface and Sub-surface Officer and then sub-specialized as a Clearance Diving Officer.

Favorite subject in high school: It’s hard to remember back that far! I would say chemistry and lunch time!

Favorite food: Pizza

What he thinks of underwater archaeology: It’s fascinating! I had very limited exposure to it before meeting the Parks Canada team. I have learned a lot from working with them. We had the opportunity to do underwater archaeology training through our workups training for preparing for the North. It is absolutely fascinating and really admirable what this team can do!


Larry Lyver

Royal Canadian Navy Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class
Larry Lyver
© Parks Canada

Name: Larry Lyver

Age: 49 years old

Profession: Chief Petty Officer 2nd class in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a port inspection diver and operations chief with the Fleet Diving Unit Atlantic.

Role in the April ice dive mission: I will be the coxswain of the ice camp which means I will be in charge of the day to day conduct, the feeding, the bed down and the overall safety and coordination of the entire ice camp.

What he will miss the most during the mission: April is a big month for me and my family. My birthday is on March 30th. I’m turning 50 this year but I will be gone on mission already at that time. My son’s birthday and my wedding anniversary are in April too!

Hometown: St. John’s, Newfoundland

Studies: Right out of high school I decided I wanted to join the military and this is where I am today, 32 years later!

Favorite subject in high school: My best subject in high school was English. My favourite subject was biology.

Favorite sport: I have two and they happen to be very Canadian sports: hockey and lacrosse.

What he thinks of underwater archaeology: I think it’s a fascinating subject and I’m very excited to be involved in this project. To be able to tell the story that the world has been trying to get answers to for 170 years almost – now that’s remarkable!


Evan Beaton

Royal Canadian Navy Master Seaman Evan Beaton
Evan Beaton
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada

Name: Evan Beaton

Age: 32 years old

Profession: Master Seaman in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a Clearance Diver.

Role in the April ice dive mission: I will be the Team Buffer (Job Foreman). My job is to make sure that everyone is aware of where they need to be and when they need to be there so that the dive runs smoothly.

What you will miss the most during the mission: My wife and our two small boys

Hometown : New Haven, Prince Edward Island

Favorite subject in high school: Shop Class

Favorite hockey team: Ottawa Senators

What you think of underwater archaeology: Underwater archeology is truly a world of its own. How items are preserved in colder climates is simply amazing. Every dive on any type of wreck is a truly exciting experience!


Sean Barry

Sean Barry, Royal Canadian Navy Petty Officer 1st Class
Sean Barry
© Parks Canada

Name: Sean Barry

Age: 48 years old

Profession: Petty Officer 1st class in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a clearance diver.

Role in the April ice dive mission: I am the dive supervisor. I control the dive site and oversee the safety of the divers.

What you will miss the most during the mission: My family

Place of birth/hometown: St. John’s, Newfoundland

Studies: Military

Favourite sport: Hockey and lacrosse

Favourite food: Lasagna

What he thinks of underwater archaeology: I just recently got into underwater archaeology. Nobody knows what really happened on the ship. It would be very interesting to find out what happened to all those men in the North. I look forward to being up there!


Graeme McBride

Graeme McBride, Royal Canadian Navy Lieutenant
Graeme McBride
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada

Name: Graeme McBride

Age: 43 years old

Profession: Medical Officer, Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy

Role in the April ice dive mission: I am the team’s physician.

What you will miss the most during the mission: My family

Place of birth/hometown: Pickering, Ontario

Studies: Dalhousie Medical School in Halifax

Favourite subject in high school: Science

Favourite color: Blue


Yves Bernard

Yves Bernard, Royal Canadian Navy Petty Officer 1st Class
Yves Bernard
© Parks Canada

Name: Yves Bernard

Age: 36 years old

Profession: Petty Officer 1st class in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a port inspection diver.

Role in the April ice dive mission: I am a diver but because of my expertise with robotics I hope to assist with the activities using the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV).

Hometown: I have lived in Halifax, Nova Scotia, for the past 15 years, but I was born in Sept- Îles, Quebec.

Studies: I joined the Canadian Armed Forces right from high school and I have been a diver ever since.

Favourite sport: I love martial arts.

What he thinks of underwater archaeology: Sometimes life surprises us! Ever since I was in kindergarten I wanted to be an archaeologist, but that never happened. And now I find myself working on this project with Parks Canada’s Underwater Archaeology Team. I have worked with the team for the past two years and I was even on the boat when the HMS Erebus was discovered. I have never dived on the wreck, so I am really looking forward to returning to the wreck site, this time to dive.


Michael Heyer

Michael Heyer, Royal Canadian Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class
Michael Heyer
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada

Name: Michael Heyer

Age: 47 years old

Profession: Petty Officer 2nd class in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a Port Inspection Diver.

Role in the April ice dive mission: Dive supervisor

What you will miss the most during the mission: My wife and our dogs

Place of birth/hometown: Penticton, British Columbia

Studies: I completed all my dive training with the Fleet Diving Unit Atlantic.

Favourite subject in high school: Auto shop

Favourite hockey team: Halifax Mooseheads


Peter Reed

Royal Canadian Navy Master Seaman
Peter Reed
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada

Name: Peter Reed

Age: 43 years old

Profession: Master Seaman in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am an Imagery Technician (photographer) specialized in underwater imagery.

Role in the April ice dive mission: My mission is to provide as much imagery as possible of the site for the world to see, learn, and read about, as well as for archaeological purposes. I will be providing still and video imagery to the archaeologists, the public and social media.

What he will miss the most during the mission: Same as anytime I go away: my family, the comfort of home, and my dog.

Hometown: London, Ontario

Studies: I began my training to become a diver in the Canadian Armed Forces by joining the Naval Reserve unit aboard HMCS Carleton in Ottawa as Port Inspection Diver in May 2001 and completing all my dive training at the Fleet Diving Unit Atlantic.

My training to become an image technician started by spending six months at the Canadian Forces School of Aerospace Technology and Engineering at Canadian Forces Base Borden. That was followed by one year at a posting at CFB Halifax to complete seven projects, and six more months of on-the-job training after that. Then, in the final phase to become a fully qualified image technician, I had five more months of training back at the aerospace technology and engineering school.

Favourite subject in high school: General machinist and welding

Favourite food: I would have to say my favourite food is trying the local food everywhere you travel. I have had some amazing meals while traveling the world.

What he thinks of underwater archaeology: I never really thought of underwater archaeology that much until this adventure. I have always been fascinated by what is hidden in the water; it’s another world that has so many secrets. As I work more with Parks Canada it is becoming an amazing adventure and I am trying to absorb as much knowledge as possible about the Franklin Expedition. This will be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I will never forget.


Caleb Hooper

Royal Canadian Navy Leading Seaman
Caleb Hooper
© Parks Canada

Name: Caleb Hooper

Age: 25 years old

Profession: Leading Seaman in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a clearance diver.

Role in the April ice dive mission: My role in the current mission is to assist the Parks Canada divers underwater and make their life easier while they’re working.

What you will miss the most during the mission: My dog Trigger

Hometown: Deer Island, a little island in New Brunswick. No one really knows about it!

Favourite subject in high school: Physical education, anything with no homework!

Favorite sport: My favourite sport is definitely hockey! I grew up playing it so it brings back many childhood memories.

What do you think of underwater archaeology: This is my first exposure to underwater archaeology and it’s definitely different than what we usually do in the Navy: it’s a slower pace. When you’re not really moving a whole lot you need to wear a couple of extra layers!


Josh Oldford

Royal Canadian Navy Leading Seaman
Josh Oldford
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada

Name: Josh Oldford

Age: 32 years old

Profession: Leading Seaman in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a Clearance Diver.

Role in the April ice dive mission: Diver

What he will miss the most during the mission: All food not coming from a bag, hot showers and my family.

Hometown: Gander, Newfoundland

Studies: High school in Gander, N.L., B.A at Memorial University in St. Johns, N.L., and training as Clearance Diver in Victoria, B.C.

Favourite subject in high school: As I pause and stare off into space trying to recall… Probably biology!

Favourite sport: Fly fishing would me my favourite pastime.

What he thinks of underwater archaeology: I am well versed into underwater work but archaeology is a new challenge to me. Unearthing such an important piece of history will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience that I am very much looking forward to.


Ryan Burrel

Royal Canadian Navy Leading Seaman
Ryan Burrel
© 2015 DND-MDN Canada

Name: Ryan Burrel

Age: 30 years old

Profession: Leading Seaman in the Royal Canadian Navy. I am a clearance diver with the Fleet Diving Unit Pacific.

Role in the April ice dive mission: One of my roles will be as a technician and another role will be as a diver. I will be responsible for maintaining the gear as well as helping Parks Canada’s underwater archaeologists with some of their diving.

What he will miss the most during the mission: I’ll miss my family the most. I’ve got two young boys and my wife at home. It’s going to be hard being without them but I’m sure it will be worth it in the end.

Hometown: I grew up in Windsor, Ontario, and now I live in Victoria, British Columbia.

Studies: I was a civilian diver before I joined the Navy. I learned to dive on the East Coast as a civilian and then the military trained me on the West Coast.

Favourite subject in high school: I liked technical work so auto shop was good and carpentry as well. I liked those subjects. English, not so much.

Favourite sport: Hockey, of course. I’m Canadian!

 

 

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