Divers Save Navy US$1-million a Year on Waterjet Anode Work

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US Navy divers recently completed a first-time full underwater waterjet seal on the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) USS Fort Worth which enabled  them to inspect and replace the cathodic protection system anodes mounted in the intakes. On this waterjet propelled ship it’s a job that needs to be done every four months, and so NAVSEA’s Supervisor of Salvage and Diving (SUPSALV) was tasked to develop a procedure that would enable the anodes to be replaced at sea in order to avoid dry-docking.

In early course Navy engineers developed a plate to seal the waterjet inlet, as well as external patches to isolate the waterjet, so as to create a dry working environment for the inspection (a fairly common procedure in smaller waterjet propelled vessels for this kind of inspection, but less so for a large warship of this type). Joe Theodorou, SUPSALV program manager pointed  out: “Having this capability saves the Navy $100 million in dry dock costs in the San Diego area.”

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